Sunday, 19 February 2012

Anglesey Abbey Gardens and Lode Mill

Spent a lovely day with friends yesterday walking the spectacular gardens at the National Trust's Anglesey Abbey in Cambridgeshire. The house was closed but it didn't detract us from the visit.


The woodland trail was a delight to see and full of weird and wonderful wildlife and so peaceful. Trees were abundant with hanging bird feeders, even the hedgehogs had their own little houses. What was so beautiful were the banks of snowdrops lining the paths and under trees. I've never seen so many and were told that over 200 varieties span the gardens. Close on their tails are the tiny shoots of bluebells just popping out of the ground.




This time of year you would not expect to see much colour but this was not the case. Many of the hundreds of colourful evergreen shrubs included the Tibetan Cherry and Scarlet Willow.



I've no idea what this is but it was so pretty. If anyone has any ideas I'd love to know.



A walk to the working old Lode Mill was quite a treat. Along the way we found a copse of very eerie looking Himalayan Silver Birches which the man at the mill told us they are jet washed annually to keep up their appearance!


Records show that a watermill was on this site dating back to around 1086 and recorded in the Domesday Book. The present structure dates from the eighteenth century and although the structure and use of the mill has undergone a few changes it has been restored with the help of the Cambridgeshire Wind and Watermill Society to the picturesque Mill it is today.


On the way back to the main garden areas we were surprised to see this Redwood Tree that had twice been struck by lightning, hence its odd shape.


There are gardens for all seasons and another couple of visits are a must, especially in the Spring when the house will be open too and where the scent of over 4,000 hyacinths can be found in the more formal gardens. Summer too is supposed to be wonderful with displays of irises, lupins, delphiniums and salvias in the Herbaceous Border.

A lovely day out and a cheerful thought that Spring is definitely on its way.

11 comments:

  1. The plant's name you are after is called
    Garrya Elliptica. Its lovely isn't it. What fantastic scenery. Hope you go back again to give us more pictures to look at?

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    1. Thankyou so much DC I really had no idea of its name. You'd think they'd label them wouldn't you. It was so pretty.

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  2. Datacreata beat me to it with the mystery plant they can look quite dull until the catkins appear. Lovely place for a visit.

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  3. What a lovely visit you had and I've enjoyed looking at all your photos. Anglesey Abbey is a place I've always wanted to visit but never have - even when we lived near Peterborough which isn't so very far away. Maybe one day:)

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  4. Its great to get out and about - roll on spring! x

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  5. Hi just come across your blog, lovely photos, those silver birches look absolutely stunning, well done to ever jet washes them!. Julie xxx

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  6. What a lovely place to spend a day outdoors. How funny the trees the trees are jet washed!
    Lisa x

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  7. Hi I've only just foudn your blog. I've never been to that part of the country and your pictures have honestly encouraged me to do so oneday. Should be a little accessible for visiting as my mother in law lives in Essex.

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  8. That 'dangly' bush looks like a Garrya elliptica. If you decide to buy one you have to make sure that you get the right sex (I think) because, as far as I can remember, only the male plants have the long catkins. They're also quite boring for the rest of the year!

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  9. It looks a lovely place, often going somewhere out of season is really enjoyable. I agree with MorningAJ that the shrub is garrya elliptica. I don't have far to look for a comparison as my neighbour has one in his front garden.

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  10. What a lovely place. I thought the same thing about the silver birch describing them as eerie before I read your own text. I also love paper birch with the white sheets hanging from the trees. I am allergic to birch and would not plant them in my garden although you see them a great deal here.

    Hugs from Holland,
    Heidi

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